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How can something that seems straight out of a science-fiction novel like brain-computer interfaces help us improve the aftereff

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The Future of Restoring Functionality in Stroke Survivors

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  • Overview

    Every 40 seconds: that’s how often someone in the United States has a stroke. And it’s not uncommon for many of these patients to experience impaired functionality for the rest of their lives. But now, thanks to the latest technology, could something that seems straight out of a science-fiction novel like brain-computer interfaces help us improve the aftereffects of a stroke? Joining Dr. David Weisman to discuss his research that sought to address that exact question is Dr. Mijail Serruya.

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Details
Presenters
Comments
  • Overview

    Every 40 seconds: that’s how often someone in the United States has a stroke. And it’s not uncommon for many of these patients to experience impaired functionality for the rest of their lives. But now, thanks to the latest technology, could something that seems straight out of a science-fiction novel like brain-computer interfaces help us improve the aftereffects of a stroke? Joining Dr. David Weisman to discuss his research that sought to address that exact question is Dr. Mijail Serruya.

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Programs 9/20/21