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Incidental Meniscal Findings on Knee MRI

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Incidental Meniscal Findings on Knee MRI
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  • Overview

    A patient in your office describes the knee pain they have been feeling for an extended period of time. The MRI that you order on their knee reveals meniscal damage. New research is telling us that meniscal tears may be more common than we realize, and further, raises questions as to whether the meniscal tear is really the source of your patient's knee pain. Dr. David Felson, professor of medicine at the Boston University (BU) School of Medicine and professor of epidemiology at the BU School of Public Health, explains that damaged meniscal cartilage may not be directly linked to knee pain. Dr. Mark Nolan Hill hosts.

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Details
Presenters
Comments
  • Overview

    A patient in your office describes the knee pain they have been feeling for an extended period of time. The MRI that you order on their knee reveals meniscal damage. New research is telling us that meniscal tears may be more common than we realize, and further, raises questions as to whether the meniscal tear is really the source of your patient's knee pain. Dr. David Felson, professor of medicine at the Boston University (BU) School of Medicine and professor of epidemiology at the BU School of Public Health, explains that damaged meniscal cartilage may not be directly linked to knee pain. Dr. Mark Nolan Hill hosts.

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Programs 7/25/21