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Elective Aesthetic Surgery: Handling Problem Patients

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Elective Aesthetic Surgery: Handling Problem Patients
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  • Overview

    There may be many reasons for a patient to consider elective aesthetic surgery, but whatever the reason, they are often linked to the patient's expectations for the surgical outcome. While we know that most patients maintain a reasonable outlook for their care, how can we work to maintain an affable relationship with those who have unrealistic post-surgery expectations? Dr. Peter Adamson, professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, and head of facial plastic and reconstructive surgery at the University of Toronto, details his experiences and his extensive research on patient relations with host Dr. Michael Epstein. How often does the thought of turning away a patient come into play in a typical practice? Are more of the so-called "problem patients" specific to certain procedures?

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  • Overview

    There may be many reasons for a patient to consider elective aesthetic surgery, but whatever the reason, they are often linked to the patient's expectations for the surgical outcome. While we know that most patients maintain a reasonable outlook for their care, how can we work to maintain an affable relationship with those who have unrealistic post-surgery expectations? Dr. Peter Adamson, professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, and head of facial plastic and reconstructive surgery at the University of Toronto, details his experiences and his extensive research on patient relations with host Dr. Michael Epstein. How often does the thought of turning away a patient come into play in a typical practice? Are more of the so-called "problem patients" specific to certain procedures?

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