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An End to Asthma Indications for Long-Acting Beta Agonists?

An End to Asthma Indications for Long-Acting Beta Agonists?
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Long-acting, single-agent beta agonists should be used in tandem with a corticosteroid for the treatment of asthma. Despite a black box warning fro...
  • Overview

    Long-acting, single-agent beta agonists should be used in tandem with a corticosteroid for the treatment of asthma. Despite a black box warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to this effect, evidence suggests nearly half of our patients do not take these medications together, which appears to result in more severe asthma attacks and an increased mortality risk. In theory, longer-acting beta agonists (LABAs) should help with compliance, but if these single-agent drugs aren't taken as recommended, is there a role for them in the treatment of asthma? Dr. Jesse Joad, professor of pediatrics at the University of California, Davis School of Medicine and a former member of the FDA's Pulmonary and Allergy Drug Advisory Committee, talks with host Dr. Jennifer Shu about the pharmacologic and logistical differences between LABAs taken as monotherapy and LABAs taken in combination with a steroid. Dr. Joad will also provide her insights on the best ways to communicate with your patients on these important issues.

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