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The Future of Medical Research

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The Future of Medical Research
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    This week, Mark and Margaret speak with Jack Andraka, 16 year old winner of last year's Intel Science and Engineering First Prize. Mr. Andraka has been nicamed the "Teen Prodigy of Pancreatic Cancer" by the Smithsonian for the device he created for early detection of pancreatic, ovarian and lung cancer. It's cheap, fast and accurate in numerous blind tests. He has been awarded by the White House, the Vatican, and the Royal College of Physicians, and he was deemed by his Lab Mentor at Johns Hopkins as the "Thomas Edison of our times."

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  • Overview

    This week, Mark and Margaret speak with Jack Andraka, 16 year old winner of last year's Intel Science and Engineering First Prize. Mr. Andraka has been nicamed the "Teen Prodigy of Pancreatic Cancer" by the Smithsonian for the device he created for early detection of pancreatic, ovarian and lung cancer. It's cheap, fast and accurate in numerous blind tests. He has been awarded by the White House, the Vatican, and the Royal College of Physicians, and he was deemed by his Lab Mentor at Johns Hopkins as the "Thomas Edison of our times."

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