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Exploring a Nondaily Contraceptive Option for Your Patients 

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    Might this nondaily, progestin-only contraceptive option be right for your patients?

    Please See

    Indication, Selected Safety Information, Prescribing Information and Patient Information Links Below

    • Overview

      Prescribing Information | Patient Information

      Today, women have a variety of contraceptive options available to them, including long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) like NEXPLANON® (etonogestrel implant) 68 mg Radiopaque. Learn more about this effective form of contraception in this short video. 

        Prescribing Information | Patient Information

        Today, women have a variety of contraceptive options available to them, including long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) like NEXPLANON® (etonogestrel implant) 68 mg Radiopaque. Learn more about this effective form of contraception in this short video. 

      • INDICATION

        NEXPLANON is indicated for use by women to prevent pregnancy.

      • SELECTED SAFETY INFORMATION

        Who is not appropriate for NEXPLANON

        • NEXPLANON should not be used in women who have known or suspected pregnancy; current or past history of thrombosis or thromboembolic disorders; liver tumors or active liver disease; undiagnosed abnormal genital bleeding; known or suspected breast cancer, personal history of breast cancer, or other progestin-sensitive cancer now or in the past; or allergy to any component of NEXPLANON.

        WARNINGS and PRECAUTIONS             

        Complications of insertion and removal

        • Palpate immediately after insertion to ensure proper placement. Undetected failure to insert the implant may lead to unintended pregnancy.
        • Insertion and removal-related complications may include pain, paresthesias, bleeding, hematoma, scarring, or infection. If NEXPLANON is inserted too deeply (intramuscular or in the fascia), neural or vascular injury may occur. Implant removal may be difficult or impossible if the implant is not inserted correctly, inserted too deeply, not palpable, encased in fibrous tissue, or has migrated. If at any time the implant cannot be palpated, it should be localized and removed.
        • There have been postmarketing reports of implants located within the vessels of the arm and the pulmonary artery; in these cases, endovascular or surgical procedures may be needed for removal.
        • Failure to remove the implant may result in continued effects of etonogestrel, such as compromised fertility, ectopic pregnancy, or persistence or occurrence of a drug-related adverse event.

        NEXPLANON and pregnancy

        • Should pregnancy or lower abdominal pain occur while using NEXPLANON, be alert to the possibility of an ectopic pregnancy.
        • Rule out pregnancy before inserting NEXPLANON.

        Educate her about the risk of serious vascular events

        • There have been postmarketing reports of serious arterial thrombotic and venous thromboembolic events, including cases of pulmonary emboli (some fatal), deep vein thrombosis, myocardial infarction, and strokes, in women using etonogestrel implants. Assess women with known risk factors. NEXPLANON should be removed if thrombosis occurs.
        • NEXPLANON should not be used prior to 21 days postpartum due to risk of thromboembolism.
        • Women with a history of thromboembolic disorders should be made aware of the possibility of a recurrence.
        • In case of long-term immobilization, consider removing NEXPLANON.

        Counsel her about changes in bleeding patterns

        • Women are likely to have changes in their menstrual bleeding pattern with NEXPLANON, including changes in frequency, intensity, or duration. Evaluate abnormal bleeding as needed to exclude pathologic conditions or pregnancy. In clinical studies of the non-radiopaque etonogestrel implant, the most common reason for discontinuation was changes in bleeding patterns (11.1%).

        Be aware of other serious complications, adverse reactions, and drug interactions

        • Remove NEXPLANON if jaundice occurs or blood pressure rises significantly and becomes uncontrolled.
        • Monitor prediabetic and diabetic women using NEXPLANON.
        • Observe women with a history of depressed mood. Consider removing NEXPLANON in patients who become significantly depressed.
        • The most common adverse reactions (≥10%) reported in clinical trials were headache (24.9%), vaginitis (14.5%), weight increase (13.7%), acne (13.5%), breast pain (12.8%), abdominal pain (10.9%), and pharyngitis (10.5%).
        • Drugs or herbal products that induce enzymes, including CYP3A4, may decrease the effectiveness of NEXPLANON or increase breakthrough bleeding.
        • The efficacy of NEXPLANON in women weighing more than 130% of their ideal body weight has not been studied. Serum concentrations of etonogestrel are inversely related to body weight and decrease with time after implant insertion. NEXPLANON may be less effective in overweight women.
        • NEXPLANON does not protect against HIV or other STDs.

        Please read the accompanying Prescribing Information and Patient Information.


        © 2022 Organon group of companies. All rights reserved.
        ORGANON and the ORGANON Logo are trademarks of the Organon group of companies.
        US-XPL-115305 02/22

      Schedule4 Dec 2022