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Optimizing Outcomes in Familial Hypercholesterolemia: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Management

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  • Overview

    According to the Consensus Statement published by the European Atherosclerosis Society, more than 90% (and maybe as high as 99%) of individuals with FH in the US have not been properly diagnosed due to gaps in screening, recognition and classification of FH. If not identified and aggressively treated from an early age, individuals with FH have a 20-fold increased life time risk of heart disease compared to the general population. However, with optimal treatment, an affected individual’s lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease approaches the risk found in the general population. Although the clinical symptoms are not as pronounced in cases of heterozygous FH, both homozygous (HoFH) and heterozygous FH (HeFH) patients still have an elevated risk of developing coronary heart disease at some point in their life.  Early diagnosis and treatment for both HoFH and HeFH can significantly reduce the risk of coronary heart disease or delay its onset.  Both homozygous and heterozygous FH are serious conditions that require special attention and treatment. 

  • Disclosure of Relationships with Ineligible Companies

    In accordance with the ACCME Standards for Integrity and Independence and the University of Cincinnati policy, all faculty, planning committee members, and other individuals, who are in a position to control content, are required to disclose all relationships with ineligible companies (commercial interest) within the last 24-months. If a relevant relationship is identified, it is the responsibility of the University of Cincinnati to initiate a mechanism to mitigate the relationship(s). All educational materials are reviewed for fair balance, scientific objectivity, and levels of evidence.

    The following faculty has reported relevant relationships that have been mitigated:

    Christie M. Ballantyne, MD, FACP, FACChas disclosed the following relevant financial relationships:
    Consultant: Novartis, Novo Nordisk, Pfizer, Sanofi-Synthelabo

    John J. Russell, MD (host) has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships:
    Speaker and Advisory Board Member: GlaxoSmithKline, US Sanofi, Bayer

    The following reviewers/planners/authors do not have any relevant relationships to report:

    Susan Tyler, PhD, CMP, CHCP, CME Director, has nothing to disclose.
    Bruce Gebhardt, MD, CME Reviewer, has nothing to disclose.
    Heather Muskopf, Program Manager, has nothing to disclose.
    Otto Ratz, MD, has nothing to disclose.
    Christina Culbert, MSc, has nothing to disclose.

  • Target Audience

    This continuing medical education (CME) activity is intended for physicians and other health care professionals who manage patients with homozygous (HoFH) and heterozygous (HeFH) familial hypercholesterolemia, including cardiologists, endocrinologists, pediatricians, and primary care physicians.

  • Learning Objectives

    After participating in this educational activity, participants should be better able to:

    • Recognize the prevalence and develop a framework to facilitate an appropriate diagnosis of homozygous (HoFH) and heterozygous (HeFH) familial hypercholesterolemia;
    • Assess the clinical data of currently available and emerging therapeutic options for HoFH and HeFH;
    • Examine shared decision making strategies and patient decision aids to enhance outcomes in FH patients.
  • Accreditation and Credit Designation Statements

    Accreditation Statement
    This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of the University of Cincinnati and CORE Medical Education, LLC. University of Cincinnati is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    Credit Designation
    The University of Cincinnati designates this enduring material for a maximum of .5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    Provider
    This CME activity was developed through the joint providership of the University of Cincinnati and CORE Medical Education, LLC.

  • Provider(s)/Educational Partner(s)

    ReachMD Healthcare ImageReachMD Healthcare Image

  • Commercial Support

    This program is supported by an educational grant from Esperion Therapeutics, Inc. and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

  • Publication Dates

    Release Date:

    Expiration Date:

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Details
Presenters
Related
Comments
  • Overview

    According to the Consensus Statement published by the European Atherosclerosis Society, more than 90% (and maybe as high as 99%) of individuals with FH in the US have not been properly diagnosed due to gaps in screening, recognition and classification of FH. If not identified and aggressively treated from an early age, individuals with FH have a 20-fold increased life time risk of heart disease compared to the general population. However, with optimal treatment, an affected individual’s lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease approaches the risk found in the general population. Although the clinical symptoms are not as pronounced in cases of heterozygous FH, both homozygous (HoFH) and heterozygous FH (HeFH) patients still have an elevated risk of developing coronary heart disease at some point in their life.  Early diagnosis and treatment for both HoFH and HeFH can significantly reduce the risk of coronary heart disease or delay its onset.  Both homozygous and heterozygous FH are serious conditions that require special attention and treatment. 

  • Disclosure of Relationships with Ineligible Companies

    In accordance with the ACCME Standards for Integrity and Independence and the University of Cincinnati policy, all faculty, planning committee members, and other individuals, who are in a position to control content, are required to disclose all relationships with ineligible companies (commercial interest) within the last 24-months. If a relevant relationship is identified, it is the responsibility of the University of Cincinnati to initiate a mechanism to mitigate the relationship(s). All educational materials are reviewed for fair balance, scientific objectivity, and levels of evidence.

    The following faculty has reported relevant relationships that have been mitigated:

    Christie M. Ballantyne, MD, FACP, FACChas disclosed the following relevant financial relationships:
    Consultant: Novartis, Novo Nordisk, Pfizer, Sanofi-Synthelabo

    John J. Russell, MD (host) has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships:
    Speaker and Advisory Board Member: GlaxoSmithKline, US Sanofi, Bayer

    The following reviewers/planners/authors do not have any relevant relationships to report:

    Susan Tyler, PhD, CMP, CHCP, CME Director, has nothing to disclose.
    Bruce Gebhardt, MD, CME Reviewer, has nothing to disclose.
    Heather Muskopf, Program Manager, has nothing to disclose.
    Otto Ratz, MD, has nothing to disclose.
    Christina Culbert, MSc, has nothing to disclose.

  • Target Audience

    This continuing medical education (CME) activity is intended for physicians and other health care professionals who manage patients with homozygous (HoFH) and heterozygous (HeFH) familial hypercholesterolemia, including cardiologists, endocrinologists, pediatricians, and primary care physicians.

  • Learning Objectives

    After participating in this educational activity, participants should be better able to:

    • Recognize the prevalence and develop a framework to facilitate an appropriate diagnosis of homozygous (HoFH) and heterozygous (HeFH) familial hypercholesterolemia;
    • Assess the clinical data of currently available and emerging therapeutic options for HoFH and HeFH;
    • Examine shared decision making strategies and patient decision aids to enhance outcomes in FH patients.
  • Accreditation and Credit Designation Statements

    Accreditation Statement
    This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of the University of Cincinnati and CORE Medical Education, LLC. University of Cincinnati is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    Credit Designation
    The University of Cincinnati designates this enduring material for a maximum of .5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    Provider
    This CME activity was developed through the joint providership of the University of Cincinnati and CORE Medical Education, LLC.

  • Provider(s)/Educational Partner(s)

    ReachMD Healthcare ImageReachMD Healthcare Image

  • Commercial Support

    This program is supported by an educational grant from Esperion Therapeutics, Inc. and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

  • Publication Dates

    Release Date:

    Expiration Date:

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Schedule25 Oct 2021
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