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Noninvasive Prenatal Screening 2016 ACMG Position Statement

    Noninvasive prenatal screening for fetal aneuploidy, 2016 update: a position statement of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics An...
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    • Overview

      Noninvasive prenatal screening for fetal aneuploidy, 2016 update: a position statement of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics

      Anthony R. Gregg, MD, MBA, Brian G. Skotko, MD, MPP, Judith L. Benkendorf, MS, Kristin G. Monaghan, PhD, Komal Bajaj, MD, Robert G. Best, PhD, Susan Klugman, MD and Michael S. Watson, MS, PhD

      Gregg, AR et al. Noninvasive prenatal screening for fetal aneuploidy: 2016 update

       

      Abstract 

      Noninvasive prenatal screening using cell-free DNA (NIPS) has been rapidly integrated into prenatal care since the initial American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) statement in 2013. New evidence strongly suggests that NIPS can replace conventional screening for Patau, Edwards, and Down syndromes across the maternal age spectrum, for a continuum of gestational age beginning at 9–10 weeks, and for patients who are not significantly obese. This statement sets forth a new framework for NIPS that is supported by information from validation and clinical utility studies. Pretest counseling for NIPS remains crucial; however, it needs to go beyond discussions of Patau, Edwards, and Down syndromes. The use of NIPS to include sex chromosome aneuploidy screening and screening for selected copy-number variants (CNVs) is becoming commonplace because there are no other screening options to identify these conditions. Providers should have a more thorough understanding of patient preferences and be able to educate about the current drawbacks of NIPS across the prenatal screening spectrum. Laboratories are encouraged to meet the needs of providers and their patients by delivering meaningful screening reports and to engage in education. With health-care-provider guidance, the patient should be able to make an educated decision about the current use of NIPS and the ramifications of a positive, negative, or no-call result.

       

      Reviewed By:  Martin R. Chavez, MD, FACOG

      Provided By: Omnia Education
      Commercial Support: This activity is supported by an independent educational grant from Roche Diagnostics.

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